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July 2019

THE FOUR TYPES OF LEADER

Ancient-antique-architecture-615344

 

Leadership is one of the key issues of the modern world, and yet it is rarely understood. For the most part, modern organisations tend to think of leaders as souped-up managers, roles made onerous by the weight of attending to minutiae. The reality is that leadership is not the same as management, at least not in my view. In fact, leadership is primarily about motivation.

 

Now, I am biased, of course. I created a tool called the Motivational Map, after all! However, it is my belief, based on my research, prolonged thinking, and experience, that the primary role of a leader is to motivate their staff (or following / peers), not anything else. This is aligned with what is called ‘transformational leadership’. High motivation not only leads to happier, healthier people, who are driven by what they do and committed to it, but also to a better bottom line, as productivity levels soar. If you can motivate staff, the other management stuff is trivial by comparison. This is to say nothing of increased retention, engagement, and more.

 

However, being an effective leader (rather than merely an efficient manager) is not easy, otherwise, why are there so many books on how to do it? The reality is, truly great leaders are like truly great Prime Ministers: exceptionally rare and subject to shifting perception. As our culture changes, we re-evaluate leaders. Churchill would be a good example of this. Once viewed as a saviour by the British people, he is less palatable to a society which places greater value on equality than they did in the past. However, leaving retrospective analysis aside, part of the issue of leadership is the issue of authority. In the Bible, the Pharisees question Christ, saying: ‘By what authority are You doing these things, and who gave You this authority?’ In Mapping Motivation for Leadership, written by myself and co-author Jane Thomas, I note:

 

A leader has to have authority from somewhere in order to function at all…if this is true at a religious level, so it is true at a political, social and even domestic level.’

 

So, how do leaders acquire this authority? Well, I believe there are four principle sources:

Positional, Reward, Expert and Charismatic. Please note that one type of power is not inherently superior to another. Context determines what type of power might be best applied to a situation or team. Again, quoting from our book (Jane Thomas, co-author):

 

A ‘perfect’ leader (and try imagining a ‘perfect’ person, never mind a leader!) would effortlessly be able to deploy all four types as was suitable; but the reality is, most leaders have a preferred type or style or way of operating, and usually with one or two other back-up styles.’

 

So, let’s look at these four types in slightly more detail:

 

POSITIONAL POWER

comes from the title or role of the individual, and which holds them accountable for results. It can, negatively, be too hierarchical, traditional, top-down, command and controlling.

 

REWARD POWER

comes from being able to reward people for their efforts, often in ‘carrot or stick’ ways. Negatively, its power can diminish rapidly when rewards are not perceived as valuable or relevant.

 

EXPERT POWER

comes from having advanced skills and knowledge that others either respect or defer to, and so is a source of authority and being authoritative. Negatively, over-reliance on experts can disempower others and lead to over-reliance on one or a few voices.

 

CHARISMATIC POWER

comes essentially from the individual: others give you this power because of who you are, and the respect they feel for you. Negatively, this can lead to the ‘cult of personality’ and blind followership.

 

Think about what type of leader you might be, what other aspects of leadership you might embody, and how you can correctly deploy these traits to lead in a more effective way.

 

And, if you want to find out more about leadership, then look for Mapping Motivation for Leadership at https://bit.ly/2O9yO42

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Interview with a BP #3: Zsuzsa Czagler

"I view Maps like a full blood test plus MRI. It is a tool that will show you where all the structural weaknesses, along with acute or chronic inflammations, are. If you are a coach and you do not have the Maps, then you are like a doctor that has no medical diagnostic tools!”

 

Becoming a Business Practitioner is a big step, but the rewards are also tremendous. We wanted to speak with our BPs and get a sense of what they felt the biggest challenges and rewards of being a BP were, as well as foreground the amazing work they do. This interview with Zsuzsa Czagler is our third, revealing the secrets of life as a BP and the incredible difference they make in the Maps community and beyond. 

 

Zsuzsa_image_circle

INTRO

Zsuzsa is a Motivational Maps Business Practitioner: an ICF ACC coach, NLP Master, and Liberating Leadership practitioner, with 19 years of top management experience. She operates in Hungary.

HR Searcher
TOP MOTIVATOR: SEARCHER

Zsuzsa is a passionate Searcher motivator, but she also has a thirst for knowledge inspired by her Expert motivator. When she first encountered the Motivational Maps, she described it as a ‘lightning strike moment’: ‘I realised why I couldn’t save myself from quitting the job that I enjoyed for many years previously and why, as a managing director, I had been unable to save other people from leaving.’

 

The Motivational Maps allowed her to see what her true motivators were and to pursue them. This led to her seeking more and more information about the Maps, including reading all published Mapping Motivation books, watching videos, reading articles by James Sale, and participating in several additional Maps training programs.

 

Intriguingly, Zsuzsa believes that all of her motivators feed into her desire to make a difference, even her lower motivators. ‘The Star is my lowest motivator, but now I see it as a tool to help fulfill my mission as a Searcher. At the Maps conference, there was a woman at my table who was a Searcher and Star, which at first I thought was unusual, but then she said something that has stuck with me: “If I am not the one on stage talking, then I am not the one making a difference in a room”.’

All of the motivators feed in to who we are and have the potential to help us get to where we need to be.


TOP TIP

For many, the Maps are a journey of individual discovery, but for Zsuzsa, it’s as much about teams as one-to-one: ‘When I left my corporate position, one of my things was that I wanted to help people be happy. I didn’t know how at the time, but now I realise that motivation is big part of that.’ She has found that she is able to make a difference to teams in just a single day. However, there have also been hard learning curves where she has found circumstances where she was unable to instigate change ‘Often because a leader is not ready,’ she observes. ‘The leader needs to be at a certain level. This led me to Ali Stewart and her insights on how to train leaders.’

Being a BP has been a continual learning experience, from first discovering the Maps, to developing ideas on Engagement, to becoming a qualified Liberating Leadership practitioner, and finally a Motivational Maps Business Practitioner. Zsuzsa regularly meets with the Aspirin network, and BPs from other countries, to share knowledge and experience. Being a BP is a big responsibility. You have to keep on top of the expertise, and your own motivation levels.”

LINKS

https://vipcoachingcenter.hu/rolam/bemutatkozas/

What is "Interview with a BP"

BP stands for "Business Practitioner". Within Motivational Maps, there are three "tiers" of practitioner: Licensed Practitioners (LPs) who sell and interpret Maps to help companies motivate and improve the wellbeing of staff. Business Practitioners who can recruit and train LPs as well as tackling bigger Maps opportunities. And Senior Practitioners (SPs) who can train and create Business Practitioners, coordinate large networks, and develop Motivational Maps.